Creme Data Sets

Creme provides a very broad range of data, including the:

  • What We Eat in America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) series from 1999 to 2008. Many of our datasets are available for different year combinations and in Food Frequency Questionnaire formats.
  • The Concise European Food Consumption Database from the European Food Safety Authority, which consists of consumption data from 19 EU member states, is installed in Creme Food. This data is sufficient for conservative exposure assessments.
  • The Dutch National Food Surveys including NEVO nutrient data and several of the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys from the UK, can also be installed on request. Licences are required from the data owners.

Examples of other data included are the Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey and the Pesticide Data Program database from the US Department of Agriculture, the Food Commodity Intake Database (FCID), the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS) and the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII).

Other surveys include the Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance (IUNA) national food consumption surveys for different age groups.

Raw food consumption survey data tend to be large data sets and come in a variety of formats. Therefore, the Creme data team executes a series of steps in order to tailor these data sets to the Creme Food format. All the necessary data is formatted in order to match the input tables in Creme Food. For providing validated and accurate data sets the team uses published results from journals or from original study publications. Different food and nutrient assessments using different subject filters are then run in order to compare the output data with the published results.

In the last few months the Creme data team has been constantly collecting, installing and updating data sets. More anthropometric, socio-demographic and other characteristic subject data have been added to each survey and this process is set to continue.

Written by Mark Lambe on April 19 2011

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